Results tagged ‘ Steve Sax ’

Inside the minds of Saxy and Landreaux

SaxyAndLandreaux.jpg

Photo / Jon Soo Hoo

The 50th Anniversary ceremony before yesterday’s game was beautiful.  There were Dodgers from every decade, all wearing their uniforms.  From the flannels of the 50’s and 60’s to the home-whites in the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s, it was great to see legends like Duke Snider and fan-favorites like Erik Karros come from the bullpen to their respective positions.

And the reaction from the crowd was heartwarming.  The applause and adoration was almost as loud as the B1 flyover.  

I had the pleasure of seeing two of my favorite ex-players, Kenny Landreaux and Steve Sax.  They were great players, and Sax was a breath of fresh air.  He played baseball like my wife shops; all day long.

The only thing with Sax was his intelligence never quite reached the same level as his playing ability.  In other words, he wasn’t the brightest guy.

One day we’re playing in San Francisco.  I had been harping on Sax to stop hitting the ball in the air because he was a line drive hitter, and to use all parts of the field.  So before the game we are standing behind the cage during BP, and Sax comes up to me and says, “Hey Skipper, I think I’ve got your hitting theory down pat.”

 “That’s great Saxy.”

 “Eighty percent of the time I try to hit the ball up the middle,” he said.

“Beautiful.”

“Twenty percent of the time I try to hit the ball to left and the other twenty percent I try to hit it right.”

I looked at Kenny Landreaux who was standing right next to me and said, “Did you hear what he just said?”

Now Kenny was dumber than Sax.  He went to Arizona State University, and I often wondered what the requirements were for admission.  Do they check you to see if you’re breathing?

Landreaux said, “Skip, I’ve been in the big leagues for 13 years and that’s the best hitting theory I’ve heard yet.”

And I had to win pennants with these guys!

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